The Most Extravagant Dinner Parties in History

Posted by Ken

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Can I Have My $20 Billion Back Now, Please?

Michael JacksonWhen you're the world's richest man -- with a net worth of more than forty billion dollars -- it's probably par for the course to throw yourself a thirty million dollar birthday party. You might be wanting that money back, though, when corruption and stock market crashes cut your wealth by eighty percent.

The Sultan of Brunei, a.k.a. Hassanal Bolkiah, turned fifty in 1996 at the height of his wealth. Figuring his oil-funded riches were limitless, he went all out to celebrate.

He invited twenty thousand guests, including Prince Charles, and fed them caviar and champagne. For the night's entertainment, guests were treated to a Michael Jackson concert.

For his sixtieth in 2006, the Sultan scaled things back a bit. In the interim decade, his brother had run off with twenty billion and his portfolio had taken a serious hit in the Asian stock market meltdowns. Don't cry for the Sultan, though -- he still used a chunk of his ten billion dollars to host another party. This time, only ten thousand people were invited!

You can see video of Michael Jackson's 1996 performance here.

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